Metropolitan Home’s 2009 Showtime House

By kristin

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This weekend I had the chance to inspect Metropolitan Home’s 2009 Showtime House, which spans two debonair penthouse apartments in Tribeca (NYC) and features a series of rooms thematically designed after six of Showtime’s popular TV series: Dexter, The Tudors, Californication, Weeds, United States of Tara, and Nurse Jackie.

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The showhouse's penthouse view

One of my favorite rooms was designed by Marie Aiello and inspired by America’s favorite imaginary serial killer: Dexter. The apartment, like the star of the show, first appears calm and collected with elegant accents such as White Seatbelt Chairs (from the Phillips Collection), Bertoia kitchen stools (from DWR) and Paola Lenti’s mohair sofa (provided by Karkula). Upon further inspection, however, imperfections and peculiarities such as fingerprints on glassware (by Jane D’Arensbourg) and an LED screen in the dining room featuring a moving blinking eye (by Traxon Technologies) reveal a more sinister and fragmented being.

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"Dexter" Dining Room

Aiello also designed the space as a lesson in dialectics, incorporating elements of light and dark, warmth and iciness, cohesion and distortion. The warmth of the fireplace is contrasted with Swarovski crystal skulls and 3D glass tiles while a classic Vladimir Kagan rocker holds a tortured teddy bear.

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"Dexter" Living Room

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"Dexter" baby rocker

Paul Latham designed the Weeds-inspired lounge to convey the series’ many emotional layers. Apothecary jars and clay pipes (from eBAY) and a large weed-like ceramic sculpture (by Julia Kunin) provide obvious references to the show’s namesake. However, vintage swing arm lights (from Remains lighting), a zebra rug (from African Skins), and a Chinese root table base (from D-Collection) set the tone for a timeless retreat and a place where Weeds’ main character, Nancy, can escape. (And having the stressful life of a drug dealer, a place of refuge is a necessity.)

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Paul Latham-designed "Weeds" Lounge

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Bullet-riddled sheets of metal provide interesting artwork for the penthouse hallways

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The "Weeds" Dining Room eliciting tension between good and evil

Heading to the Nurse Jackie master bedroom, a swirling display of medical pills stretch across all four walls, making the room feel like a prescription-fueled playground rather than a place for recuperating. Designers Christopher Coleman and Angel Sanchez did a nice job of blending traditional medical elements (x-rays, saline drips and vintage swivel chairs) with playful lighting fixtures and colorful furniture accents.

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"Nurse Jackie" Master Bedroom, designed by Christopher Coleman and Angel Sanchez

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"Nurse Jackie" bedside accessories

Nurse Jackie vase

IV bag repurposed into an outdoor vase

Next I headed to the sin den that personified Hank Moody’s hedonistic world in Californication. The first master bedroom I encountered was designed by Markus Dochantschi, from StudioMDA. With an imbedded mattress and pop-up wet bar in arm’s reach, a mirrored ceiling and cadre of easily accessible toys, the designer masterfully creates a place where pleasure and fetishism are tangible.

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"Californication" Master Bedroom by studioMDA

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"Positions" - a mirrored ceiling made of several planes of mirrored plexiglas, tilted at different angles

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Fetish-inspired light fixture

The second Californication master bedroom, designed by Holly Hunt for Joannah Kornak, caters to a completely different side of Hank Moody – one as a man with interests other than women. The focus of this room has a more earthy and rustic appeal, with Southwest-inspired textile patterns, a plethora of scholarly books on the shelves and the distinct aroma of a variety of wood and animal hides.

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"Californication" Master Bedroom designed by Joannah Kornak for Holly Hunt

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Met Home‘s Showtime House (at 415 Greenwich Street, NYC) will be open to the public every weekend until October 18th, 2009. Tickets are $20 and benefit the non-profit organization Housing Works.

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