Interior Design Hall of Fame Inductees

By Katie Suh

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Last week, Interior Design hosted the 34th annual Hall of Fame gala at the River Pavilion at Javits Center. The black-tie event is the Academy Awards of the interior design industry. This year, the ceremony honored five distinguished individuals selected by Interior Design editor-in-chief Cindy Allen and a committee of previous “HoF” members. Says Allen, “This year’s Hall of Fame inductees have the uncanny ability to push beyond, and their talent is matched only by a desire to create the new and the next. Their collective work is also grounded in a deep sense of humanity, that has impacted their clients, communities, and the greater world.”

Let’s take a look at this year’s inductees:

Marcel Wanders

Legendary Dutch industrial and interior designer Marcel Wanders is a pivotal figure in the industry, continuing to challenge the boundaries with unique creations marked by a playful, quirky, and whimsical character. Wanders’ extensive repertoire encompasses more than 1,900 projects and product designs for Baccarat, Cappellini, Christofle, Flos, Kartell, KLM, Louis Vuitton, Morgans Hotel Group, Poliform, Puma, and Swarovski. His eye-catching designs are also featured in the most prestigious cultural institutions and museums throughout the world including the Centre Pompidou and MoMA. “I want to change design as an idea. We have created a throwaway society and I think that’s what we have to fight within the context of design. I want to create a world that’s more durable, that’s just more romantic – more human.” – Wanders.

Mondrian Doha, a five-star hotel in Qatar, designed by Marcel Wanders. Courtesy of Marcel Wanders.

Mondrian Doha, a five-star hotel in Qatar, designed by Marcel Wanders. Courtesy of Marcel Wanders.

Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott of IwamotoScott

Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott are the work and life couple who have been powerhouses in the San Francisco design and architecture arena with massive projects on the workplace scene. Their recent completed work includes Pinterest, Bloomberg Media, and Twitch. The fluid and organic designs of Iwamoto and Scott transform any space into a living and breathing organism – one that not only serves as a perceptual experience but interacts with its environment. “When we approach interiors, we do it with an architectural eye. We like to think about it really spatially and formally – and abstractly. You know, light and proportion – they’re such classic drivers of architecture for so long – but it’s the space that we occupy that allows us to perceive all those relationships.” – Iwamoto and Scott.  

Voussoir Cloud installation for the Southern California Institute of Architecture gallery in Los Angeles in 2008. Courtesy of IwamotoScott.

Voussoir Cloud, an installation for the Southern California Institute of Architecture gallery in Los Angeles in 2008. Courtesy of IwamotoScott.

Patrick Tighe of Tighe Architecture

As one of Los Angeles’s preeminent architects, Patrick Tighe has a unique vernacular for design. His philosophy, that architecture can profoundly impact one’s experience of and in this world, influences every project he works on. Tighe has not only completed large-scale commercial and retail projects, but he has also worked on projects that reach out to local marginalized communities by creating housing for the homeless and LGBT and creating an all-accessible playground on Malibu beach. His works in varying social contexts have truly made him a leader in the industry. “You can’t do a great building without thinking about the interior. And you can’t do a great interior without thinking about how it connects to a larger idea.” – Tighe

Trahan_Ranch

Trahan Ranch, a residential project in the rolling hills landscape of Texas Hill Country. Courtesy of Tighe Architecture.

Kengo Kuma of Kengo Kuma and Associates

One of the pioneering figures of contemporary architecture today is Kengo Kuma. His practice is unique in its exploration of everyday materials and use in different unconventional ways. Kuma mixes traditional Japanese ideas with that of modern-day techniques, creating unprecedented structures with the same appearance of lightness and softness but with unexpected materials like stone in place of wood or glass used in traditional Japanese architecture. Kuma continues to explore the limitless boundaries of materiality in his designs. “Design is about the relationship between the material and us. The most important thing is to create intimacy between me and every element of the building.” – Kuma

A Yakitori bar on the outskirts of Tokyo, decorated with a web of colored cables. Courtesy of Erieta Attali.

A yakitori bar on the outskirts of Tokyo, decorated with a web of colored cables. Courtesy of Erieta Attali.

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